Now and Then

I just want to put it out there that bipolar I is not who I am… It’s something I have. When I live out my day, I don’t tell most people I’m bipolar, nor do I think about bipolar. It’s become a small part of me, but I choose to reflect on it so I can write about it for others who struggle with all of this.

When I was first diagnosed, bipolar was the biggest part of who I was, and at times it was me. When I lived out my days, I’d tell most people I met that I’m bipolar, and couldn’t stop thinking about bipolar. It became all of who I was, and I couldn’t stop writing about it and thinking about it to figure out what the heck was going on. I vented to friends and family a lot about it, burning many people out.

I still remember the moment I was diagnosed, that the doctor said I would lead a relatively normal life. He was right, as much as in the past I wanted to slap him in the face for what he said as it seemed impossible. It’s taken over ten years for normality to become reality, and it’s worth all the hard work, no questions asked.

Do you know any people who are mental illness survivors?

Published by

theothersid3

I am a male, mid thirties, diagnosed with severe bipolar I in 2004. It's a small part of my life, now. I love to write on my blog, where I am known simply as theothersid3. I have a special interest in bipolar, spirituality, philosophy, and recovery. During the day/night, I work in a factory. I spend time outside writing in my journals about many things. Some day, I hope I can help a lot of people who struggle with severe bipolar and their loved ones through what I write. This is an anonymous blog, and I'm reaching out to the world when I can, to strive for this goal of mine. My wife has enabled me to strive farther than I thought I ever could. I love you!

2 thoughts on “Now and Then”

  1. “bipolar I is not who I am… It’s something I have” This is a very powerful statement. And I think many need to realise that =) Please share your experiences, disappointments and what makes you feel better.

    1. Thank you for your response and suggestions. I’ll get to work on them; there is so much stuff on all you ask me to share, and I’ll gladly work on putting some fresh ink on paper 🙂

      Much can be said about taking ownership of your bipolar, instead of it owning you. To get there, someone with BPD needs constant support from other people as much as a plant needs water to grow. It’s easy for us to take the support we receive for granted at times, unfortunately, or refuse it.

      Anyway, I’ll work on some good responses for you soon.

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